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ID#:3786
Description:This Petri dish culture plate contained an unknown growth medium that had been inoculated with a culture of the fungal organism, Exserohilum rostratum, formerly known as Drechslera rostrata, which had been extracted from a foot lesion of a phaeohyphomycosis patient.

Phaeohyphomycosis is of a group of fungal infections characterized by superficial and deep tissue involvement caused by dematiaceous, dark-walled fungi that form pigmented hyphae, or fine branching tubes, and yeast-like cells in the infected tissues.
Exserohilum is a common mold found in soil and on plants, especially grasses, and it thrives in warm and humid climates. Exserohilum is a very rare cause of infection in people, but it has been known to cause several different types of infections, including infection in the skin or the cornea (the clear, front part of the eye), which are typically due to skin or eye trauma. Exserohilum can also cause more invasive forms of infection in the sinuses, lungs, lining of the heart, and bone, which are thought to be more likely to occur in people with weak immune systems. Like other fungal infections, Exserohilum infections cannot be transmitted from person to person.

High Resolution: Click here for hi-resolution image (18.35 MB)
Content Providers(s):CDC/ Dr. Libero Ajello
Creation Date:1977
Photo Credit:
Links:National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID); Division of Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases (DFWED); Fungal Disease: Exserohilum
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Copyright Restrictions:None - This image is in the public domain and thus free of any copyright restrictions. As a matter of courtesy we request that the content provider be credited and notified in any public or private usage of this image.

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