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ID#:16809
Description:This 2014 image depicts Centers for Disease Control (CDC) laboratorian Alicia Shams, as she was showing viewers a Petri dish culture plate that demonstrated growth of Klebsiella pneumoniae on a growth medium of MacConkey agar. Using an inoculating loop held in her right hand, Ms. Shams was pointing out the bacterial colonies which grew atop the MacConkey medium contained in the Petri dish she held in her left hand.
Klebsiella is a type of Gram-negative bacteria that can cause different types of healthcare-associated infections, including pneumonia, bloodstream infections, wound or surgical site infections, and meningitis. Increasingly, Klebsiella bacteria have developed antimicrobial resistance, most recently to the class of antibiotics known as carbapenems. Klebsiella bacteria are normally found in the human intestines (where they do not cause disease). They are also found in human stool (feces). In healthcare settings, Klebsiella infections commonly occur among sick patients who are receiving treatment for other conditions. Patients whose care requires devices like ventilators (breathing machines) or intravenous (vein) catheters, and patients who are taking long courses of certain antibiotics are most at risk for Klebsiella infections. Healthy people usually do not get Klebsiella infections.
High Resolution: Click here for hi-resolution image (33.44 MB)
Content Providers(s):CDC/ Melissa Dankel
Creation Date:2014
Photo Credit:James Gathany
Links:CDC - National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID); Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion (DHQP); Healthcare-associated Infections (HAIs): Klebsiella pneumoniae in Healthcare Settings
CDC – CDC News Room; Digital Press Kit: i>”Untreatable: Today’s Drug-Resistant Health Threats”
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Copyright Restrictions:None - This image is in the public domain and thus free of any copyright restrictions. As a matter of courtesy we request that the content provider be credited and notified in any public or private usage of this image.

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