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Description:From the “Illustrated Manual for the Recognition and Diagnosis of Certain Animal Diseases”, published in 1982, by the Mexico-United States Commission for the Prevention of Foot and Mouth Disease, this image depicts a white, stringy, mucopurulent vaginal discharge dripping from the vaginal orifice of a mare that has a contagious equine metritis (CEM) infection.
“CEM is a transmissible, exotic, venereal disease of horses caused by the bacterium Taylorella equigenitalis. Thoroughbred horses appear to be more severely affected by the disease than other breeds. Because animals may be asymptomatic, the disease is difficult to detect and control. There is no evidence that CEM affects people. CEM is a serious disease because it is highly contagious. When coupled with the fact that mares can be bred only during certain seasons, CEM can have a devastating effect on equine reproductive efficiency."
High Resolution: Click here for hi-resolution image (18.35 MB)
Content Providers(s):CDC/Dr. Jerry J. Callis, PIADC/Dr. Brian W.J. Mahy, CDC
Creation Date:1982
Photo Credit:
Links:Plum Island Animal Disease Center (PIADC) - United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) – Agricultural Research Service (ARS) – U.S. Department of Homeland Security
CDC Organization
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Copyright Restrictions:None - This image is in the public domain and thus free of any copyright restrictions. As a matter of courtesy we request that the content provider be credited and notified in any public or private usage of this image.