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ID#:18254
Description:Produced by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), this anterolateral view of this patient’s neck reveals the presence of an erythematous rash that had been attributed to a shingles, or herpes zoster outbreak, due to the varicella zoster virus (VZV), the same virus that causes chickenpox. Please see the Flickr link below for additional NIAID photographs of herpes zoster outbreaks.
After a person recovers from chickenpox, the virus stays dormant (inactive) in the body. For reasons that are not fully known, the virus can reactivate years later, causing shingles.

Shingles is a painful rash that develops on one side of the face or body. The rash forms blisters that typically scab over in 7 to 10 days and clears up within 2 to 4 weeks.

Before the rash develops, people often have pain, itching, or tingling in the area where the rash will develop. This may happen anywhere from 1 to 5 days before the rash appears.

Most commonly, the rash occurs in a single stripe around either the left or the right side of the body. In other cases, the rash occurs on one side of the face. In rare cases (usually among people with weakened immune systems), the rash may be more widespread and look similar to a chickenpox rash. Shingles can affect the eye and cause loss of vision.

Other symptoms of shingles can include:

- Fever

- Headache

- Chills

- Upset stomach

High Resolution: Click here for hi-resolution image (25.37 MB)
Content Providers(s):National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
Creation Date:2012
Photo Credit:National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
Links:CDC – National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases; Division of Viral Diseases; About Shingles (Herpes Zoster)
Flickr - National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID); Herpes Zoster
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Copyright Restrictions:None - This image is in the public domain and thus free of any copyright restrictions. As a matter of courtesy we request that the content provider be credited and notified in any public or private usage of this image.

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