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ID#:15727
Description:The left elbow of this patient displayed the familiar maculopapular rash that had been caused when this man had brushed against a poison ivy plant, Toxicodendron radicans.

Many native and exotic plants are poisonous to humans when ingested or if there is skin contact with plant chemicals. However, the most common problems with poisonous plants arise from contact with the sap oil of several ever-present native plants that cause an allergic skin reaction.
Poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac release an oil, urushiol, when the leaf or other plant parts are bruised, damaged, or burned. When the oil gets on the skin an allergic reaction, referred to as contact dermatitis, occurs in most exposed people as an itchy red rash with bumps or blisters. When exposed to 50 micrograms of urushiol, an amount that is less than one grain of table salt, 80 to 90 percent of adults will develop a rash.

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Content Providers(s):CDC/ Richard S. Hibbits
Creation Date:1971
Photo Credit:
Links:CDC - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Education and Information Division; Workplace Safety & Health Topics: Poisonous Plants
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Copyright Restrictions:None - This image is in the public domain and thus free of any copyright restrictions. As a matter of courtesy we request that the content provider be credited and notified in any public or private usage of this image.

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