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ID#:14061
Description:Securely seated in a swing seat, this smiling young boy was having fun with his mother at a community playground. He was wearing a darkly-colored t-shirt, and his sun-exposed skin was protected by a covering of previously-applied sunscreen.

A hat would have been advisable as well. Hats that shade the face, scalp, ears, and neck are easy to use and give great protection. Baseball caps are popular among kids, but they don't protect their ears and neck. If your child chooses a cap, be sure to protect exposed areas with sunscreen.
Too Much Sun Hurts

Turning pink? Unprotected skin can be damaged by the sun's UV rays in as little as 15 minutes. Yet it can take up to 12 hours for skin to show the full effect of sun exposure. So, if your child's skin looks "a little pink" today, it may be burned tomorrow morning. To prevent further burning, get your child out of the sun.

Tan? There's no other way to say it—tanned skin is damaged skin. Any change in the color of your child's skin after time outside—whether sunburn or suntan—indicates damage from UV rays.

Cool and cloudy? Children still need protection. UV rays, not the temperature, do the damage. Clouds do not block UV rays, they filter them—and sometimes only slightly.

Oops! Kids often get sunburned when they are outdoors unprotected for longer than expected. Remember to plan ahead, and keep sun protection handy—in your car, bag, or child's backpack.

High Resolution: Click here for hi-resolution image (11.52 MB)
Content Providers(s):CDC/ Amanda Mills
Creation Date:2011
Photo Credit:Amanda Mills
Links:CDC - National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion; Division of Cancer Prevention and Control; Cancer Prevention and Control: Skin Cancer
CDC - National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion; Division of Cancer Prevention and Control; Skin Cancer – Protecting Children from the Sun
Categories:
CDC Organization
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MeSH
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Analytical, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Techniques and Equipment
Diagnosis
Diagnostic Techniques and Procedures
Physical Examination
Pigmentation
Skin Pigmentation
Therapeutics
Hygiene
Skin Care
Anatomy
Integumentary System
Skin
Dermis
Epidermis
Anthropology, Education, Sociology and Social Phenomena
Social Sciences
Sociology
Social Welfare
Child Welfare
Biological Sciences
Biological Phenomena, Cell Phenomena, and Immunity
Biological Phenomena
Pigmentation
Skin Pigmentation
Digestive, Oral, and Skin Physiology
Skin Physiology
Skin Aging
Skin Pigmentation
Environment and Public Health
Environment
Meteorological Factors
Atmosphere
Weather
Sunlight
Ultraviolet Rays
Chemicals and Drugs
Chemical Actions and Uses
Pharmacologic Actions
Physiological Effects of Drugs
Protective Agents
Radiation-Protective Agents
Sunscreening Agents
Therapeutic Uses
Dermatologic Agents
Sunscreening Agents
Specialty Uses of Chemicals
Cosmetics
Sunscreening Agents
Protective Agents
Radiation-Protective Agents
Sunscreening Agents
Dermatologic Agents
Sunscreening Agents
Diseases
Congenital, Hereditary, and Neonatal Diseases and Abnormalities
Abnormalities
Skin Abnormalities
Disorders of Environmental Origin
Wounds and Injuries
Burns
Sunburn
Neoplasms
Neoplasms by Histologic Type
Neoplasms, Germ Cell and Embryonal
Neuroectodermal Tumors
Neuroendocrine Tumors
Melanoma
Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial
Carcinoma
Adenocarcinoma
Carcinoma, Skin Appendage
Neoplasms, Adnexal and Skin Appendage
Carcinoma, Skin Appendage
Neoplasms, Nerve Tissue
Neuroectodermal Tumors
Neuroendocrine Tumors
Melanoma
Nevi and Melanomas
Melanoma
Nevus
Neoplasms by Site
Skin Neoplasms
Skin and Connective Tissue Diseases
Skin Diseases
Keratoacanthoma
Keratosis
Photosensitivity Disorders
Dermatitis, Photoallergic
Dermatitis, Phototoxic
Sunburn
Xeroderma Pigmentosum
Pigmentation Disorders
Hyperpigmentation
Melanosis
Acanthosis Nigricans
Lentigo
Xeroderma Pigmentosum
Skin Abnormalities
Skin Neoplasms
Health Care
Persons
Persons
Age Groups
Child
Child, Preschool
Physical Sciences
Natural Sciences
Physics
Radiation
Radiation, Nonionizing
Ultraviolet Rays
Psychiatry and Psychology
Behavior and Behavior Mechanisms
Behavior
Child Behavior
Child Rearing
Human Development
Child Development
Copyright Restrictions:None - This image is in the public domain and thus free of any copyright restrictions. As a matter of courtesy we request that the content provider be credited and notified in any public or private usage of this image.

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