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ID#:13697
Description:This woman was pictured in her doctor’s office undergoing an eye exam. Using an ophthalmoscope, the doctor looks inside the eyeball in order to see if any intraocular damage has occurred as a result of this patient's diabetic condition.

In diabetic eye disease, high blood glucose and high blood pressure cause small blood vessels to swell and leak liquid into the retina of the eye, blurring the vision and sometimes leading to blindness. People with diabetes are also more likely to develop cataracts – a clouding of the eye’s lens, and glaucoma – optic nerve damage. Laser surgery can help these conditions.

How can I keep my eyes healthy if I have diabetes?

There’s a lot you can do to prevent eye problems. A recent study shows that keeping your blood glucose level closer to normal can prevent or delay the onset of diabetic eye disease. Keeping your blood pressure under control is also important. Finding and treating eye problems early can help save sight.
It is best to have an eye doctor give you a dilated eye exam at least once a year. The doctor will use eye drops to enlarge (dilate) your pupils to examine the backs of your eyes. Your eyes will be checked for signs of cataracts or glaucoma, problems that people with diabetes are more likely to get.

Because diabetic eye disease may develop without symptoms, regular eye exams are important for finding problems early. Some people may notice signs of vision changes. If you’re having trouble reading, if your vision is blurred, or if you’re seeing rings around lights, dark spots, or flashing lights, you may have eye problems. Be sure to tell your health care team or eye doctor about any eye problems you may have.

High Resolution: Click here for hi-resolution image (11.52 MB)
Content Providers(s):CDC/ Amanda Mills
Creation Date:2011
Photo Credit:Amanda Mills
Links:CDC – Division of Diabetes Translation; National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion; Diabetes Public Health Resource
CDC – Division of Diabetes Translation; National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion; Vision Health Initiative (VHI)
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Copyright Restrictions:None - This image is in the public domain and thus free of any copyright restrictions. As a matter of courtesy we request that the content provider be credited and notified in any public or private usage of this image.

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