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ID#:13567
Description:This photograph depicts a young diabetic girl who was in the process of carrying out a self-monitored blood glucose test. After having performed a finger stick (see PHIL 13564), and introduced the blood droplet to the glucose monitor (see PHIL 13565), she was now in the process of reading the liquid crystal display on the monitor in order to find the level of glucose in her blood.

Monitoring of blood glucose levels is frequently performed to guide therapy for persons with diabetes. Blood glucose monitoring and insulin administration can be accomplished in two ways: self-monitoring of blood glucose and insulin administration, where the individual performs all steps of the testing and insulin administration themselves, and assisted monitoring of blood glucose and insulin administration, where another person assists with or performs testing and insulin administration for an individual.
It is very important to a diabetic’s day to day health to control his blood glucose, also known as blood sugar. Keeping ones glucose level close to normal helps prevent, or delay some diabetes problems, such as eye disease, kidney disease, and nerve damage. One thing that can help you control your glucose level is to keep track of it. You can do this by:

- Testing your own glucose a number of times each day (self-monitoring blood glucose). Many people with diabetes    test their glucose 2 to 4 times a day.

- Getting an A1C test from your health care provider about every 3 months.

High Resolution: Click here for hi-resolution image (31.33 MB)
Content Providers(s):CDC/ Amanda Mills
Creation Date:2011
Photo Credit:Amanda Mills
Links:CDC – Division of Diabetes Translation; National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion; Diabetes Public Health Resource
CDC – Division of Diabetes Translation; National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion; Diabetes Public Health Resource: Take Charge of Your Diabetes
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Copyright Restrictions:None - This image is in the public domain and thus free of any copyright restrictions. As a matter of courtesy we request that the content provider be credited and notified in any public or private usage of this image.

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