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ID#:13221
Description:This image depicts an epidemiologist participating in a Nipah virus investigation wearing the personal protective equipment (PPE) required while doing field work involving pathogens that are highly-infectious, and which produce a very high mortality rate.
Infection with Nipah virus is associated with an encephalitis (inflammation of the brain) characterized by fever and drowsiness and more serious central nervous system disease, such as coma, seizures, and inability to maintain breathing.

Illness with Nipah virus begins with 3-14 days of fever and headache. This is followed by drowsiness and disorientation characterized by mental confusion. These signs and symptoms can progress to coma within 24-48 hours. Some patients have had a respiratory illness during the early part of their infections.

The natural reservoir for Hendra virus is thought to be flying foxes (bats of the genus Pteropus) found in Australia. The natural reservoir for Nipah virus is still under investigation, but preliminary data suggest that bats of the genus Pteropus are also the reservoirs for Nipah virus in Malaysia.

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Content Providers(s):CDC
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Links:CDC – Special Pathogens Branch; Hendra Virus Disease and Nipah Virus Encephalitis
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Copyright Restrictions:None - This image is in the public domain and thus free of any copyright restrictions. As a matter of courtesy we request that the content provider be credited and notified in any public or private usage of this image.

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