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ID#:13182
Description:This historic map demonstrates the distribution of animal plague inside the United States, not including Alaska or Hawaii. Plague is an infectious disease of animals and humans caused by a bacterium named Yersinia pestis.
Distribution:

Wild rodents in certain areas around the world are infected with plague. Outbreaks in people still occur in rural communities or in cities. They are usually associated with infected rats and rat fleas that live in the home. In the United States, the last urban plague epidemic occurred in Los Angeles in 1924-25. Since then, human plague in the United States has occurred as mostly scattered cases in rural areas (an average of 10 to 15 persons each year). Globally, the World Health Organization reports 1,000 to 3,000 cases of plague every year. In North America, plague is found in certain animals and their fleas from the Pacific Coast to the Great Plains, and from southwestern Canada to Mexico. Most human cases in the United States occur in two regions: 1) northern New Mexico, northern Arizona, and southern Colorado; and 2) California, southern Oregon, and far western Nevada. Plague also exists in Africa, Asia, and South America.

High Resolution: Click here for hi-resolution image (16.62 MB)
Content Providers(s):CDC
Creation Date:1949
Photo Credit:
Links:CDC - National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases; Division of Vector-Borne Infectious Diseases; Plague Home Page
Categories:
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Copyright Restrictions:None - This image is in the public domain and thus free of any copyright restrictions. As a matter of courtesy we request that the content provider be credited and notified in any public or private usage of this image.

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