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Description:This 1972 image depicted the morphologic appearance of Neisseria gonorrhoeae colonies after having grown for a period of 24 hours on GC media base agar supplemented with IsoVitaleX. These were photographed here at a magnification of 50X. GC media base agar is used in the isolation of N. gonorrhoeae bacteria, and is often used in conjunction with various antibiotics, in order to determine N. gonorrhoeae antimicrobial sensitivity/selectivity.

What is gonorrhea?

Gonorrhea is a sexually transmitted disease (STD). Gonorrhea is caused by Neisseria gonorrhoeae, a bacterium that can grow and multiply easily in the warm, moist areas of the reproductive tract, including the cervix (opening to the womb), uterus (womb), and fallopian tubes (egg canals) in women, and in the urethra (urine canal) in women and men. The bacterium can also grow in the mouth, throat, eyes, and anus.
How common is gonorrhea?

Gonorrhea is a very common infectious disease. CDC estimates that more than 700,000 persons in the U.S. get new gonorrheal infections each year. Only about half of these infections are reported to CDC. In 2006, 358,366 cases of gonorrhea were reported to CDC. In the period from 1975 to 1997, the national gonorrhea rate declined, following the implementation of the national gonorrhea control program in the mid-1970s. After several years of stable gonorrhea rates, however, the national gonorrhea rate increased for the second consecutive year. In 2006, the rate of reported gonorrheal infections was 120.9 per 100,000 persons.

High Resolution: Click here for hi-resolution image (6.43 MB)
Content Providers(s):CDC/ W. Jerry Brown
Creation Date:1972
Photo Credit:
Links:CDC - Division of STD Prevention, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention: Gonorrhea
CDC Organization
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Copyright Restrictions:None - This image is in the public domain and thus free of any copyright restrictions. As a matter of courtesy we request that the content provider be credited and notified in any public or private usage of this image.