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ID#:10261
Description:This transmission electron microscopic (TEM) image revealed the presence of numerous herpes simplex virions, located inside a cell nucleus in this tissue sample. As members of the Herpesviridae virus family, there are two strains of the herpes simplex virus, HSV-1, which is responsible for cold sores, and HSV-2, which is responsible for genital herpes. At the core of its icosahedral proteinaceous capsid, the HSV contains a double-stranded DNA linear genome.
How do people get genital herpes?

HSV-1 and HSV-2 can be found in and released from the sores that the viruses cause, but they also are released between outbreaks from skin that does not appear to have a sore. Generally, a person can only get HSV-2 infection during sexual contact with someone who has a genital HSV-2 infection. Transmission can occur from an infected partner who does not have a visible sore and may not know that he or she is infected.

HSV-1 can cause genital herpes, but it more commonly causes infections of the mouth and lips, so-called “fever blisters.” HSV-1 infection of the genitals can be caused by oral-genital or genital-genital contact with a person who has HSV-1 infection. Genital HSV-1 outbreaks recur less regularly than genital HSV-2 outbreaks.

High Resolution: Click here for hi-resolution image (4.6 MB)
Content Providers(s):CDC/ Dr. Fred Murphy; Sylvia Whitfield
Creation Date:1975
Photo Credit:
Links:CDC – Sexually Transmitted Diseases; Genital Herpes
Categories:
CDC Organization
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Copyright Restrictions:None - This image is in the public domain and thus free of any copyright restrictions. As a matter of courtesy we request that the content provider be credited and notified in any public or private usage of this image.

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