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ID#:10260
Description:This negatively-stained transmission electron microscopic (TEM) image revealed the presence of numerous herpes simplex virions, located both inside the nucleus, and extracellularly in this tissue sample. As members of the Herpesviridae virus family, there are two strains of the herpes simplex virus, HSV-1, which is responsible for cold sores, and HSV-2, which is responsible for genital herpes. At the core of its icosahedral proteinaceous capsid, the HSV contains a double-stranded DNA linear genome.
How do people get genital herpes?

HSV-1 and HSV-2 can be found in, and released from the sores that the viruses cause, but they also are released between outbreaks from skin that does not appear to have a sore. Generally, a person can only get HSV-2 infection during sexual contact with someone who has a genital HSV-2 infection. Transmission can occur from an infected partner who does not have a visible sore and may not know that he or she is infected.

HSV-1 can cause genital herpes, but it more commonly causes infections of the mouth and lips, so-called “fever blisters.” HSV-1 infection of the genitals can be caused by oral-genital or genital-genital contact with a person who has HSV-1 infection. Genital HSV-1 outbreaks recur less regularly than genital HSV-2 outbreaks.

High Resolution: Click here for hi-resolution image (4.02 MB)
Content Providers(s):CDC/ Dr. Fred Murphy; Sylvia Whitfield
Creation Date:1975
Photo Credit:
Links:CDC – Sexually Transmitted Diseases; Genital Herpes
Categories:
CDC Organization
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Copyright Restrictions:None - This image is in the public domain and thus free of any copyright restrictions. As a matter of courtesy we request that the content provider be credited and notified in any public or private usage of this image.

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