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ID#:10234
Description:This transmission electron microscopic (TEM) image revealed the presence of numerous Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) virions, members of the Herpesviridae virus family. EBV is also known as Human herpesvirus 4 (HHV-4). At the core of its proteinaceous capsid, the EBV contains a double-stranded DNA (ds DNA) linear genome.
When infection with EBV occurs during adolescence or young adulthood, it causes infectious mononucleosis 35% to 50% of the time. The clinical diagnosis of infectious mononucleosis is suggested on the basis of the symptoms of fever, sore throat, swollen lymph glands, and the age of the patient. Usually, laboratory tests are needed for confirmation. Serologic results for persons with infectious mononucleosis include an elevated white blood cell count, an increased percentage of certain atypical white blood cells, and a positive reaction to a "mono spot" test. Although the symptoms of infectious mononucleosis usually resolve in 1 or 2 months, EBV remains dormant or latent in a few cells in the throat and blood for the rest of the person's life. Periodically, the virus can reactivate and is commonly found in the saliva of infected persons. This reactivation usually occurs without symptoms of illness.
High Resolution: Click here for hi-resolution image (3.8 MB)
Content Providers(s):CDC/ Dr. Fred Murphy
Creation Date:1975
Photo Credit:
Links:CDC - Nat. Center for Infectious Diseases; Epstein-Barr Virus and Infectious Mononucleosis
Categories:
CDC Organization
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Copyright Restrictions:None - This image is in the public domain and thus free of any copyright restrictions. As a matter of courtesy we request that the content provider be credited and notified in any public or private usage of this image.

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