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9972

PHIL Image 9972

ID#:9972
Description:Under a low magnification of 23X, this scanning electron micrographic (SEM) image depicted a dorsal view of an unidentified engorged female tick, which had been extracted from the skin of a pet cat. Note the presence of some of the cat’s fur, along with some of its skin tissue in which the tick’s gnathosoma was still embedded, while it had been obtaining a blood meal from its feline host. Also worthy of note, is the subtle demarcation of the “scutum”, or chitinous “shield” on the tick’s back, signifying that this was, indeed, a female. Note in PHIL 9959 and 9960, that the entire dorsum of that tick’s abdomen is covered by its scutum, categorizing it as a male. In female Ixodid-species ticks, the scutum only partially covers the dorsal abdomen. Ticks belong to the Phylum Arthropoda, due to the fact that they maneuver upon jointed ( “Arthro”) legs (“poda”), as well as the Class Arachnida, for they’ve eight of these legs, unlike insects, which use six legs to move about.

Ticks act as the vectors for a number what are termed “Arboviruses”, i.e., Arthropod-borne, including Lyme disease (Borrelia burgdorferi), Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) (Rickettsia rickettsii), Tularemia (Francisella tularensis), and human granulocytic ehrlichiosis (HGE) (Ehrlichia chaffeensis). Other diseases that you can get from a tick in the United States include anaplasmosis, Colorado tick fever, and Powassan encephalitis.

Some species, and some life stages of ticks are so small they can be difficult to see, but all hungrily look for animals and people to bite. Depending on the species, you can find ticks in various environments, often in, or near wooded areas. You may come into contact with ticks when walking through infested areas, or by brushing up against infested vegetation (such as leaf litter or shrubs). Ticks also feed on mammals and birds, which play a role in maintaining ticks and the pathogens they carry.

High Resolution:Right click here and select "Save Target As..." for hi-resolution image (5.48 MB)
Content Providers(s):CDC/ Callie Carr
Creation Date:2006
Photo Credit:Janice Carr
Links:
  • CDC - National Center for Zoonotic, Vector-Borne, and Enteric Diseases; Division of Vector Borne Infectious Diseases
  • DC - National Center for Zoonotic, Vector-Borne, and Enteric Diseases; Division of Vector Borne Infectious Diseases
    Categories:
    CDC Organization
    tree picture Organization – 2004 – present
    tree picture tree picture Coordinating Center for Infectious Diseases
    tree picturetree picture tree picture National Center for Infectious Diseases
    tree picturetree picturetree picture tree picture Division of Vector-Borne Infectious Diseases

    MeSH
    tree picture Biological Sciences
    tree picture tree picture Environment and Public Health
    tree picturetree picture tree picture Public Health
    tree picturetree picturetree picture tree picture Disease Transmission
    tree picturetree picturetree picturetree picture tree picture Disease Vectors
    tree picturetree picturetree picturetree picturetree picture tree picture Arthropod Vectors
    tree picturetree picturetree picturetree picturetree picturetree picture tree picture Arachnid Vectors
    tree picture Diseases
    tree picture tree picture Bacterial Infections and Mycoses
    tree picturetree picture tree picture Bacterial Infections
    tree picturetree picturetree picture tree picture Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections
    tree picturetree picturetree picturetree picture tree picture Rickettsiaceae Infections
    tree picturetree picturetree picturetree picturetree picture tree picture Rickettsia Infections
    tree picturetree picturetree picturetree picturetree picturetree picture tree picture Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever
    tree picturetree picturetree picturetree picture tree picture Tick-Borne Diseases
    tree picturetree picturetree picturetree picturetree picture tree picture Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever
    tree picturetree picturetree picturetree picturetree picture tree picture Tularemia
    tree picturetree picturetree picturetree picture tree picture Tularemia
    tree picture Organisms
    tree picture tree picture Animals
    tree picturetree picture tree picture Invertebrates
    tree picturetree picturetree picture tree picture Arthropods
    tree picturetree picturetree picturetree picture tree picture Arachnida
    tree picturetree picturetree picturetree picturetree picture tree picture Acari
    tree picturetree picturetree picturetree picturetree picturetree picture tree picture Ticks
    tree picturetree picturetree picturetree picturetree picturetree picturetree picture tree picture Ixodidae
    tree picturetree picturetree picturetree picturetree picturetree picturetree picturetree picture tree picture Dermacentor
    Copyright Restrictions:None - This image is in the public domain and thus free of any copyright restrictions. As a matter of courtesy we request that the content provider be credited and notified in any public or private usage of this image.
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    This page last reviewed: Mar. 18 2005
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