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PHIL Image 10896
 
ID#:10896
Description:Under a high magnification of 10431X, half that of PHIL 10566, this colorized scanning electron micrograph (SEM) revealed a colony of Gram-negative bacilli, or rod-shaped Salmonella sp. bacteria. The genus Salmonella is a member of the taxonomic family, Enterobacteriaceae, and approximately 2000 serotypes of this genis are known to cause disease in human beings.

How do people catch Salmonella?

Salmonella live in the intestinal tracts of humans and other animals, including birds. Salmonella are usually transmitted to humans by eating foods contaminated with animal feces. Contaminated foods usually look and smell normal. Contaminated foods are often of animal origin, such as beef, poultry, milk, or eggs, but any food, including vegetables, may become contaminated. Thorough cooking kills Salmonella. Food may also become contaminated by the hands of an infected food handler who did not wash hands with soap after using the bathroom.

Salmonella may also be found in the feces of some pets, especially those with diarrhea, and people can become infected if they do not wash their hands after contact with pets or pet feces. Reptiles, such as turtles, lizards, and snakes, are particularly likely to harbor Salmonella. Many chicks and young birds carry Salmonella in their feces. People should always wash their hands immediately after handling a reptile or bird, even if the animal is healthy. Adults should also assure that children wash their hands after handling a reptile or bird, or after touching its environment. See PHIL 10568 for a black and white version of this image.

High Resolution:Right click here and select "Save Target As..." for hi-resolution image (7.74 MB)
Content Providers(s):CDC/ Janice Haney Carr
Creation Date:2008
Photo Credit:Janice Haney Carr
Links:
  • CDC - National Center for Zoonotic, Vector-Borne, and Enteric Diseases (ZVED);Division of Foodborne, Bacterial and Mycotic Diseases (DFBMD); Salmonellosis
    Categories:
    CDC Organization

    MeSH
    tree picture Diseases
    tree picture tree picture Bacterial Infections and Mycoses
    tree picturetree picture tree picture Bacterial Infections
    tree picturetree picturetree picture tree picture Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections
    tree picturetree picturetree picturetree picture tree picture Enterobacteriaceae Infections
    tree picturetree picturetree picturetree picturetree picture tree picture Salmonella Infections
    tree picturetree picturetree picturetree picturetree picturetree picture tree picture Salmonella Food Poisoning
    tree picture tree picture Disorders of Environmental Origin
    tree picturetree picture tree picture Poisoning
    tree picturetree picturetree picture tree picture Food Poisoning
    tree picturetree picturetree picturetree picture tree picture Salmonella Food Poisoning
    tree picture Organisms
    tree picture tree picture Bacteria
    tree picturetree picture tree picture Gram-Negative Bacteria
    tree picturetree picturetree picture tree picture Gram-Negative Facultatively Anaerobic Rods
    tree picturetree picturetree picturetree picture tree picture Enterobacteriaceae
    tree picturetree picturetree picturetree picturetree picture tree picture Salmonella
    tree picturetree picture tree picture Proteobacteria
    tree picturetree picturetree picture tree picture Gammaproteobacteria
    tree picturetree picturetree picturetree picture tree picture Enterobacteriaceae
    tree picturetree picturetree picturetree picturetree picture tree picture Salmonella
    Copyright Restrictions:None - This image is in the public domain and thus free of any copyright restrictions. As a matter of courtesy we request that the content provider be credited and notified in any public or private usage of this image.
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