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10073

PHIL Image 10073

ID#:10073
Description:This negative-stained transmission electron micrograph (TEM) depicts the ultrastructural details of an influenza virus particle, or “virion”. A member of the taxonomic family Orthomyxoviridae, the influenza virus is a single-stranded RNA organism.

The flu is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses. It can cause mild to severe illness, and at times can lead to death. The best way to prevent this illness is by getting a flu vaccination each fall.

Every year in the United States, on average:

- 5% to 20% of the population gets the flu

- more than 200,000 people are hospitalized from flu complications, and

- about 36,000 people die from flu. Some people, such as older people, young children, and people with certain health conditions, are at high risk for serious flu complications. See PHIL 8430 for a black and white version of this image.

Influenza A and B are the two types of influenza viruses that cause epidemic human disease. Influenza A viruses are further categorized into subtypes on the basis of two surface antigens: hemagglutinin and neuraminidase. Influenza B viruses are not categorized into subtypes. Since 1977, influenza A (H1N1) viruses, influenza A (H3N2) viruses, and influenza B viruses have been in global circulation. In 2001, influenza A (H1N2) viruses that probably emerged after genetic reassortment between human A (H3N2) and A (H1N1) viruses began circulating widely. Both influenza A and B viruses are further separated into groups on the basis of antigenic characteristics. New influenza virus variants result from frequent antigenic change (i.e., antigenic drift) resulting from point mutations that occur during viral replication. Influenza B viruses undergo antigenic drift less rapidly than influenza A viruses.

High Resolution:Right click here and select "Save Target As..." for hi-resolution image (7.13 MB)
Content Providers(s):CDC/ Erskine. L. Palmer, Ph.D.; M. L. Martin
Creation Date:1981
Photo Credit:Frederick Murphy
Links:
  • CDC – Influenza (Flu) Homepage
    Categories:
    CDC Organization

    MeSH
    tree picture Analytical, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Techniques and Equipment
    tree picture tree picture Investigative Techniques
    tree picturetree picture tree picture Microscopy
    tree picturetree picturetree picture tree picture Microscopy, Electron
    tree picturetree picturetree picturetree picture tree picture Microscopy, Electron, Scanning
    tree picturetree picturetree picturetree picturetree picture tree picture Microscopy, Electron, Scanning Transmission
    tree picturetree picturetree picture tree picture Photomicrography
    tree picture Diseases
    tree picture tree picture Respiratory Tract Diseases
    tree picturetree picture tree picture Respiratory Tract Infections
    tree picturetree picturetree picture tree picture Influenza
    tree picture tree picture Virus Diseases
    tree picturetree picture tree picture RNA Virus Infections
    tree picturetree picturetree picture tree picture Orthomyxoviridae Infections
    tree picturetree picturetree picturetree picture tree picture Influenza
    tree picture Organisms
    tree picture tree picture Viruses
    tree picturetree picture tree picture Vertebrate Viruses
    tree picturetree picturetree picture tree picture RNA Viruses
    tree picturetree picturetree picturetree picture tree picture Orthomyxoviridae
    Copyright Restrictions:None - This image is in the public domain and thus free of any copyright restrictions. As a matter of courtesy we request that the content provider be credited and notified in any public or private usage of this image.
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    This page last reviewed: Mar. 18 2005
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